City Pottery

  

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In operation

1886-1929

Wares

plumbing and sanitary earthenware, druggists' sundries, and specialities of every description pertaining to the plumbing trade (Quarter Century's Progress 1887:278); sanitary earthenware (Industrial Directories 1901, 1906); vitreous chinaware (Industrial Directory 1909); chinaware (Industrial Directory 1912); sanitary earthenware (Industrial Directory 1918, 1927)

Notes

“Negotiations are pending for the purchase of the City Pottery on Perry street, which has not been occupied for some years” (Trenton Evening Times, Friday, July 3, 1885).

The first of the present year they found their factory inadequate to produce goods to fill their orders and they purchased the City Pottery, which had lain idle for five years. Their plant now covers a section of three blocks and is connected by an underground railroad, and is supplied with all the latest improved faciilities as regards machinery, apparatus, and modern labor-saving appliances. Two hundred skilled and experienced operators are employed, and the machinery is driven by a fifty-horse power steam engine. The firm is now manufacturing extensively plumbing and sanitary earthenware, druggists’ sundries, and specialities of every description pertaining to the plumbing trade É” (Quarter Century’s Progress 1887:278).

In 1886, the City Pottery fell into receivership and was purchased by Maddock & Sons and became part of the Maddock site (Harney 1929).

“In May, 1892 a fire destroyed the City Pottery portion of the Maddock plant. All remaining vestiges of Hattersley’s pottery vanished in the fire, being replaced with new buildings within the Maddock pottery complex. These too are now gone. The site of the old plant is located within the ramp connections from the north bound lanes of the Trenton Freeway at Perry Street” (Goldberg 1998:28).

Selected References

“Pottery Notes.” Trenton Evening Times, Friday, July 3, 1885.

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1884-1900. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ and Morrisville, PA, Included a Fund of Information Concerning Public and Private Institutions, National, State, County, City and Borough Governments, Gathered from Reliable and Official Sources.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

Quarter-Century’s Progress of New Jersey’s Leading Manufacturing Centres. Dover. 1887. International Publishing Company, New York.

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1901-1929. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1901. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1906. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1909. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. 1910. “Pottery: A History of the Pottery Industry and Its Evolution as Applies to Sanitation.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1912. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Newark Museum Association. 1914. “The Work of The Potteries of New Jersey: From 1685 to 1876 , Being Extracts from ‘The Pottery and Porcelain of the United States,’ by Edwin Atlee Barber and Marks of New Jersey Potteries, as Reproduced from ‘Pottery,’ Published by The Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company.” Newark Museum Association, Newark, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. 1916. “Manufacturers of Sanitary Earthenware.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1918. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. 1920. “Sanitary Plumbing Fixtures.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. C. 1920. “Maddock Bathrooms.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Statistics and Records, Department of Labor. 1927. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Harney, W.J. 1929. “Trenton’s First Potteries.” Sunday Times Advertiser, July 7, 14, 21 and 28, 1929.

Trenton Chamber of Commerce. 1929. “Trenton: 250th Anniversary of the Settlement of Trenton.” On file, Trenton Public Library, Trenton, New Jersey.

Thorn, C. Jordan. 1947. “Handbook of Old Pottery & Porcelain Marks.” Tudor Publishing Company, New York, New York.

Podmore, Harry J. 1951. “City Pottery.” Sunday Times Advertiser, August 5, 1951.

Robinson, Dorothy and Bill Feeny. 1980. “The Official Price Guide to American Pottery & Porcelain.” House of Collectibles, Orlando, Florida.

Quigley, M.A. and D.E. Collier. 1984. “A Capital Place: The Story of Trenton.” Historical Society and Windsor Publications, Inc., Woodland Hills, California.

Lehner, Lois. 1988. “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Frelinghuysen, Alice Cooney. 1989. “American Porcelain, 1770-1920.” Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York.

Stern, Marc Jeffrey. 1994. “The Pottery Industry of Trenton: A Skilled Trade in Transition, 1850-1929.” Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Goldberg, David J. 1998. “Preliminary Notes on the Pioneer Potters and Potteries of Trenton, N.J.: The First Thirty Years – 1852 – 1882 (And Beyond).” Privately published, Trenton, New Jersey.

Conroy, Barbara J. 1999. “Restaurant China: Volume 2.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Wall, John P. N.d. “History of the Potteries of Trenton, New Jersey.” Manuscript on file, Trenton Public Library, Trenton, New Jersey.

Other Names

Thomas Maddock & Sons Company; Thomas Maddock's Sons Company

Block and Lot:
36B/26-30, 33

Historic Street Address:
Perry St. between East Canal St. and Carroll St.; Canal St. corner of Perry St.; Delaware and Raritan Canal above Rose; Perry near Carroll; Carroll near Perry; Ewing corner of Ogden; Carroll and Ewing; Perry, Carroll and Ewing; Perry corner of Canal

Municipality:
City of Trenton