International Pottery

  

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In operation

1879-1936

Wares

yellowware (Raum 1871); white granite, c.c. and decorated ware (Industries of New Jersey 1882:214); Rockingham, white granite, cream colored, and fancy decorated (Woodward and Hageman 1883); white granite earthenware (Industrial Directory 1901) vitrified china and porcelain (Industrial Directory 1906); toilet and dinnerware (Industrial Directory 1909); dinner and hotel ware (Industrial Directory 1912, 1918); dinner, toilet & hotel ware (Industrial Directory 1927); semi-porcelain table & toilet ware (Industrial Directory 1931); Royal Blue, white granite, semi-porcelain and china wares (Harney 1929; Abramson and Karschner 1976)

Notes

“They were originally established in 1874, and in 1878 a stock company was formed as at present, and the facilities for manufacture were increased to more than double their former capacity É The manufactures are white granite, C.C. and decorated ware, which has an established reputation in the market. The premises are 300×200 feet in dimensions on which are erected ten commodious brick buildings, two, three and four stories in height É The main building is 50×150 feet and four stories in height; three others are each three story, 50×150, etc. There are three gloss, three bisque and two decorating kilns, making a total of eight kilns. A thirty-horse engine supplies the motive power and heats the buildings by means of steam pipes. Employment is given to 175 hands, included in which are some of the most expert operatives in the business É There are large sheds, stables, storehouses, etc. A canal basin adjoins the works on the north and boats are loaded direct from the premises. Railroad facilities are near at hand” (Industries of New Jersey 1882:214).

“The International Pottery Company’s works is another large establishment founded on the modest beginning of the earlier potteries in this city of potteries, and Messrs. Burgess & Campbell, the proprietors, have concentrated all their efforts on the one point of producing the best class of white granite and semi-porcelain. They have succeeded in placing on the market an excellent grade of the two lines mentioned, and have gained a reputation for durability of goods that cannot be disputed” (Trenton Evening Times, Sunday, November 15, 1885).

International Pottery Co. manufactures of the “celebrated ‘Royal Blue’, white granite, semi-porcelain and china wares; white and decorated. Vitrified china and Stationers ware” (Trenton Board of Trade 1900).

“In 1879, the new owners [Carr and Clark] sold out to William Burgess and John A. Campbell, who incorporated the firm into the International Pottery Co.” Wares were sold under the name of Burgess and Campbell as well as International Pottery Company. The pottery continued at this location under the name of International Pottery Company into the 1930s (Goldberg 1998:30-31).

Selected References

Federal Census of New Jersey. 1880. Industrial Schedules. On file, New Jersey State Archives, Trenton, New Jersey.

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1880-1900. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ and Morrisville, PA, Included a Fund of Information Concerning Public and Private Institutions, National, State, County, City and Borough Governments, Gathered from Reliable and Official Sources.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

“Industries of New Jersey, Trenton, Princeton, Hightstown, Pennington and Hopewell.” 1882. Historical Publishing Company, New York, New York, Newark, New Jersey and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Woodward, E.M. and J.F. Hageman. 1883. “History of Burlington and Mercer Counties.” Everts and Peck, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

“Among the Potters.” Trenton Evening Times, Sunday, November 15, 1885.

Jervis, William P. 1897. “A Book of Pottery Marks.” Press of Hayes Bros., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Trenton Board of Trade. 1900. “Industrial Trenton and Vicinity.” George A. Wolf Publishers, Wilmington, Delaware.

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1901-1936. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1906. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1909. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1912. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Newark Museum Association. 1914. “The Work of The Potteries of New Jersey: From 1685 to 1876 , Being Extracts from ‘The Pottery and Porcelain of the United States,’ by Edwin Atlee Barber and Marks of New Jersey Potteries, as Reproduced from ‘Pottery,’ Published by The Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company.” Newark Museum Association, Newark, New Jersey.

Secretary of State. 1914. “Corporations of New Jersey, List of Certificates to December 31, 1911.” MacCrellish & Quigley, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1918. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Statistics and Records, Department of Labor. 1927. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Harney, W.J. 1929. “Trenton’s First Potteries.” Sunday Times Advertiser, July 7, 14, 21, and 28, 1929.

New Jersey Bureau of Statistics and Records, State Department of Labor. 1931. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Thorn, C. Jordan. 1947. “Handbook of Old Pottery & Porcelain Marks.” Tudor Publishing Company, New York, New York.

Podmore, Harry J. 1954. “International Pottery Co.” Sunday Times Advertiser, November 28, 1954.

Lehner, Lois. 1980. “Complete Book of American Kitchen and Dinner Wares.” Wallace-Homestead Book Company, Des Moines, Iowa.

Robinson, Dorothy and Bill Feeny. 1980. “The Official Price Guide to American Pottery & Porcelain.” House of Collectibles, Orlando, Florida.

Lehner, Lois. 1988. “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Gaston, Mary Frank. 1994. “Collector’s Encyclopedia of Flow Blue China.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Stern, Marc Jeffrey. 1994. “The Pottery Industry of Trenton: A Skilled Trade in Transition, 1850-1929.” Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Goldberg, David J. 1998. “Preliminary Notes on the Pioneer Potters and Potteries of Trenton, N.J.: The First Thirty Years – 1852 – 1882 (And Beyond).” Privately published, Trenton, New Jersey.

Liebeknecht, William B. 2003. “Makers Marks from the Assunpink Pottery Works.” In Trenton Potteries, 4(3):6-7.

Other Names

International Pottery Company; Burgess & Campbell

Block and Lot:
3F

Historic Street Address:
Canal Street near Front Street; West Canal and Assanpink; West Canal corner of Plymouth; East Front Street Basin; Stockton and Front Street Basin

Municipality:
City of Trenton

1880 Census

Name in censusInternational Pottery Co.
Capital20000
Number of hands175
Males above 1665
Females above 1513
Children27
May to Nov hours10
Nov to May hours10
Skilled wages2.25
Ordinary wages1.25
Total wages in year38625
Full time months11
Months idle1
Value of raw material29750
Value of product81400
Number of engines1
Horse power30