William Young & Company’s Porcelain Works

  

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In operation

1856-1860

Wares

White Granite, Dipped, Edged & C.C. Wares (Boyd 1859); Queensware and hardware trimmings (Harney 1929); whiteware bowls, porcelain door furniture

Maker's Marks

Click to enlarge

Notes

The pottery began operating in 1857 as “William Young & Co.”, and in 1858 as “William Young & Sons” (Harney 1929).

Detailed history provided in Hunter Research, Inc. 2005:4-8.

“Another great pottery was the Willits [sic] Manufacturing Company, founded in 1853 by William Young and his sons. It was one of the largest firms in the East, producing not only sanitary earthenware, but quantities of white and decorated pottery, white granite and a superior art porcelain, as well as eggshell ware” (Wall n.d.:7).

Selected References

R.G. Dun & Company Collection, Mercer County. 1857-1862. 1[ 44]:287.

Boyd, W.H. 1859. “Trenton City Directory: Containing the Names of the Citizens, a Business Directory of Mercer and Burlington Counties, and an Appendix Containing Much Useful Information.” Directory. William H. Boyd Directory Publishing, New York, New York.

“The Manufactories of Trenton. Article II. The Pottery Trade.” Trenton State Gazette, Monday, August 27, 1866.

Mains, Bishop W. and Thomas F. Fitzgerald. 1877-78. “Mains and Fitzgerald’s Trenton, Chambersburg and Millham Directory: Containing the Names of the Citizens, Statistical Business Report, Historical Sketches, a List of the Public and Private Institutions, Together with National, State, County, and City Government.” Bishop W. Mains & Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

Young, Jennie J. 1879. “The Ceramic Art: A Compendium of the History and Manufacture of Pottery and Porcelain.” Harper & Bros., New York, New York.

Woodward, E.M. and John F. Hageman. 1883. “History of Burlington and Mercer Counties.” Everts and Peck, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

J.M. Elstner & Co. 1889. “New Jersey’s Leading Cities Illustrated: Historical, Biographical, Commercial Review of the Progress in Commerce, the Professions and in Social, Municipal Life.” J.M. Elstner & Co., New York, New York.

Jervis, William P. 1897. “A Book of Pottery Marks.” Press of Hayes Bros., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Trenton Board of Trade. 1900. “Industrial Trenton and Vicinity.” George A. Wolf Publishers, Wilmington, Delaware.

Newark Museum Association. 1914. “The Work of The Potteries of New Jersey: From 1685 to 1876 , Being Extracts from ‘The Pottery and Porcelain of the United States,’ by Edwin Atlee Barber and Marks of New Jersey Potteries, as Reproduced from ‘Pottery,’ Published by The Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company.” Newark Museum Association, Newark, New Jersey.

Harney, W.J. 1929. “Trenton’s First Potteries.” Sunday Times Advertiser, July 7, 14, 21 and 28, 1929.

Thorn, C. Jordan. 1947. “Handbook of Old Pottery & Porcelain Marks.” Tudor Publishing Company, New York, New York.

Robinson, Dorothy and Bill Feeny. 1980. “The Official Price Guide to American Pottery & Porcelain.” House of Collectibles, Orlando, Florida.

Gaston, Mary Frank. 1984. “American Belleek.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Leibowitz, Joan. 1985. “Yellow Ware: The Transitional Ceramic.” Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., West Chester, Pennsylvania.

Lehner, Lois. 1988. “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Frelinghuysen, Alice Cooney. 1989. “American Porcelain, 1770-1920.” Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York.

Nottle, Diane. 1997. “Beauty, Utility and Paychecks, All Built on a Base of Clay.” New York Times, 9 November, 1997.

Goldberg, David J. 1998. “Preliminary Notes on the Pioneer Potters and Potteries of Trenton, N.J.: The First Thirty Years – 1852 – 1882 (And Beyond).” Privately published, Trenton, New Jersey.

Hunter Research, Inc. 2005. “Historical and Archaeological Investigations at the Excelsior Pottery Site, Southard Street Bridge Replacement Project, City of Trenton, Mercer County, New Jersey.” Report on file, New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (NJDEP), Trenton, New Jersey.

Wall, John P. N.d. “History of the Potteries of Trenton, New Jersey.” Manuscript on file, Trenton Public Library, Trenton, New Jersey.

Other Names

William Young & Company; William Young & Company Porcelain Manufacturers

Block and Lot:
46E-1/24, 53-68, 72, 76

Historic Street Address:
Brunswick Avenue near City Limits; Southard Street; 400 Southard Street

Municipality:
City of Trenton1