Carroll Street Pottery

  

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In operation

1878-1929

Wares

plumbers' earthenware and under-glaze decorated tea, toilet and dinner sets, etc. (Industries of New Jersey 1882); sanitary earthenware, druggists' ware, underglaze painted ware, scale plates, etc. (Woodward and Hageman 1883); plumbing and sanitary earthenware, druggists sundries, and specialties of every description pertaining to the plumbing trade (Quarter Century's Progress 1887:278); sanitary earthenware, underglazed and overglazed decorated toilet ware, umbrella stands, jardinieres (Trenton Board of Trade 1900); sanitary earthenware (Industrial Directory 1901, 1906); vitreous chinaware (Industrial Directory 1909); chinaware (Industrial Directory 1912); sanitary earthenware (Industrial Directory 1918, 1927)

Notes

“In 1872 the firm became Millington, Astbury & Maddock and so continued until the death of the senior partners when Mr. Maddock became the owner. In the early part of 1882 the facilities were largely increased and the firm became as at present, Thomas Maddock & Sons. Mr. Maddock has been connected with the establishment since its opening day, The manufactures embrace plumbers’ earthenware and under-glaze decorated tea, toilet and dinner sets, etc., which are well and favorably known in the market and to the trade as highly desirable goods. The works are 100×225 feet on Carroll Street, built of brick and three stories and a basement in height. There are three gloss kilns, two bisque and one decorating kiln. Employment is given to 100 competent and experienced hands. The motive power is derived from a forty-horse power engine and the buildings are heated by steam pipes É” (Industries of New Jersey 1882:202).

In 1882 the pottery owned six kilns and employed one hundred hands (Woodward and Hageman 1883:690).

“The business carried on prior to 1872 was the manufacture of table ware. In that year they commenced the manufacture of sanitary earthenware. Previous to this time all the sanitary earthenware used in this country was imported, and persons desiring a special style or design were compelled to submit to great delays on account of the impossibility of personal interview with the manufacturer, and many new patented articles were abandoned after many futile attempts to have them made in Europe. This firm was the first to manufacture successfully druggists’ sundries, such as wedgwood mortars and pestles, evaporating dishes, and photograph trays, etc. etc., also the production of under-glaze decorated ware. The result of the efforts of Messrs. Thomas Maddock & Sons has dispelled that timid affectation which formerly led dealers to recommend their goods as ‘the best imported,’ and to encourage the consumer to purchase the best domestic articles. Another result is that the cost of the goods has been reduced fully fifty per cent. The first of the present year they found their factory inadequate to produce goods to fill their orders and they purchased the City Pottery, which had lain idle for five years. Their plant now covers a section of three blocks and is connected by an underground railroad, and is supplied with all the latest improved faciilities as regards machinery, apparatus, and modern labor-saving appliances. Two hundred skilled and experienced operators are employed, and the machinery is driven by a fifty-horse power steam engine. The firm is now manufacturing extensively plumbing and sanitary earthenware, druggists’ sundries, and specialities of every description pertaining to the plumbing trade É” (Quarter Century’s Progress 1887:278).

Established in 1859 and in 1900 considered to be the oldest sanitary pottery in the United States. It manufactured sanitary earthenware, “underglaze and overglaze decorated Toilet ware, umbrella stands, Jardinieres, etc.” (Trenton Board of Trade 1900).

By 1882 the pottery was known as Thomas Maddock’s Sons. In 1886, it added the adjoining City Pottery site. A fire broke out on original Maddock site in 1890; in 1892 there was a fire at the City Pottery site. In 1906 Thomas Maddock’s Sons absorbed the Glasgow Pottery (Harney 1929).

In 1929, the Maddock company became part of American Radiator and Standard Sanitary, and by this time had moved out of Trenton. Aside from sanitary earthenware, Thomas Maddock’s Sons made druggists specialties, scale plates, telegraph insulators, underglaze decorated tea, toilet and dinner sets. In the late 1970s surviving buildings at the pottery comprised six sections, four of which were connected. The main block was 200′ long along Carroll St. with a rear ell about 150′ long, four stories, brick with a gabled roof, projecting cornice and white label molds over windows. The building was constructed in two sections: wooden columns & beams in one half; steel structure and cast iron stilts in other. It is similar to a 100 x 100′ building on Ewing Street (Abramson and Karschner 1978:8).

Today, the buildings are home to the Trenton Rescue Mission.

Selected References

“Industries of New Jersey, Trenton, Princeton, Hightstown, Pennington and Hopewell.” 1882. Historical Publishing Company, New York, New York, Newark, New Jersey and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Woodward, E. and John F. Hageman. 1883. “History of Burlington and Mercer Counties.” Everts and Peck, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Quarter-Century’s Progress of New Jersey’s Leading Manufacturing Centres. Dover. 1887. International Publishing Company, New York.

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1898-1900. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ and Morrisville, PA, Included a Fund of Information Concerning Public and Private Institutions, National, State, County, City and Borough Governments, Gathered from Reliable and Official Sources.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

Trenton Board of Trade. 1900. “Industrial Trenton and Vicinity.” George A. Wolf Publishers, Wilmington, Delaware.

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1901-1929. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1901. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1906. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1909. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. 1910. “Pottery: A History of the Pottery Industry and Its Evolution as Applied to Sanitation.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1912. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Newark Museum Association. 1914. “The Work of The Potteries of New Jersey: From 1685 to 1876 , Being Extracts from ‘The Pottery and Porcelain of the United States,’ by Edwin Atlee Barber and Marks of New Jersey Potteries, as Reproduced from ‘Pottery,’ Published by The Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company.” Newark Museum Association, Newark, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. 1916. “Manufacturers of Sanitary Earthenware.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1918. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. 1920. “Sanitary Plumbing Fixtures.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

Thomas Maddock’s Sons Co. C.1920. “Maddock Bathrooms.” Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Statistics and Records, Department of Labor. 1927. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Harney, W.J. 1929 “Trenton’s First Potteries.” Sunday Times Advertiser, July 7, 14, 21 and 28, 1929.

Thorn, C. Jordan. 1947. “Handbook of Old Pottery & Porcelain Marks.” Tudor Publishing Company, New York, New York.

Van Hoesen, Walter Hamilton. 1973. “Crafts and Craftsmen of New Jersey.” Associated University Presses, Inc., Cranbury, New Jersey.

Abramson, D.V. and T. Karschner. 1978. “An Inventory of Engineering and Industrial Sites, Trenton, New Jersey.” On file, New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (NJDEP), Trenton, New Jersey.

Lehner, Lois. 1980. “Complete Book of American Kitchen and Dinner Wares.” Wallace-Homestead Book Company, Des Moines, Iowa.

Robinson, Dorothy and Bill Feeny. 1980. “The Official Price Guide to American Pottery & Porcelain.” House of Collectibles, Orlando, Florida.

Lehner, Lois. 1988. “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Goldberg, David J. 1998. “Preliminary Notes on the Pioneer Potters and Potteries of Trenton, N.J.: The First Thirty Years – 1852 – 1882 (And Beyond).” Privately published, Trenton, New Jersey.

Other firms at this site:

Other Names

Thomas Maddock & Sons Company; Thomas Maddock's Sons Company

Block and Lot:
10B; 11A; 12C/29, 103

Historic Street Address:
106 Ewing Street and Perry Street; Perry Street near Canal; 106 Ewing Street and 94 Carroll Street; Ewing & Ogden

Municipality:
City of Trenton

1880 Census

Name in censusThomas Maddock
Capital100000
Number of hands95
Males above 1680
Females above 156
Children9
May to Nov hours10
Nov to May hours10
Skilled wages2.5
Ordinary wages1.5
Total wages in year41600
Full time months12
Value of raw material25000
Value of product90000
Number of engines1
Horse power40