Anchor Pottery

  

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In operation

1884-1926

Wares

cream-colored ware, white granite, semi-porcelains, dinner and toilet ware (Trenton Board of Trade 1900); porcelain goods (Industrial Directory 1906); electrical porcelain (Industrial Directory 1909); dinner and toilet ware (Industrial Directory 1912, 1918, 1927)

Notes

The pottery was operated by James E. Norris. Area of approximately 440′ x 550′ on the Delaware and Raritan Canal between Pennsylvania railroad and Philadelphia & Reading railroad; the factory has spurs from each line. The pottery owned fourteen kilns (four biscuit, five gloss and five decorating) and employed two hundred fifty hands. Products were chiefly high grade cream colored ware, white granite and semi-porcelain dinner and toilet ware, both plain and decorated. Their products were shipped throughout the northeast United States (Trenton Board of Trade 1900:73).

Pottery was purchased in 1884 by Israel Lacy and was then known as Anchor Pottery. In 1926 Anchor pottery was taken over by Fulper (Harney 1929).

“Lacey remained associated with the Anchor Pottery until his death in 1894. In 1897, control of Anchor Pottery was acquired from the Lacey estate by James E. Norris and Frank and Cyril Jones” (Goldberg 1998:41).

Selected References

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1885-1900. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ and Morrisville, PA, Included a Fund of Information Concerning Public and Private Institutions, National, State, County, City and Borough Governments, Gathered from Reliable and Official Sources.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

Trenton Board of Trade. 1900. “Industrial Trenton and Vicinity.” George A. Wolf Publishers, Wilmington, Delaware.

Fitzgerald, Thomas F. 1901-1927. “Fitzgerald’s Trenton and Mercer County Directory, Together with a Directory of Bordentown, Burlington, Mount Holly and Lambertville, NJ.” Thomas F. Fitzgerald, Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1906. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1909. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1912. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Newark Museum Association. 1914. “The Work of The Potteries of New Jersey: From 1685 to 1876 , Being Extracts from ‘The Pottery and Porcelain of the United States,’ by Edwin Atlee Barber and Marks of New Jersey Potteries, as Reproduced from ‘Pottery,’ Published by The Thomas Maddock’s Sons Company.” Newark Museum Association, Newark, New Jersey.

New Jersey Bureau of Industrial Statistics. 1918. “The Industrial Directory of New Jersey.” Trenton, New Jersey.

Harney, W.J. 1929. “Trenton’s First Potteries.” Sunday Times Advertiser, July 7, 14, 21 and 28, 1929.

Thorn, C. Jordan. 1947. “Handbook of Old Pottery & Porcelain Marks.” Tudor Publishing Company, New York, New York.

Abramson, D.V. and T. Karschner. 1978. “An Inventory of Historic Engineering and Industrial Sites, Trenton, New Jersey.” On file, New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (NJDEP), Trenton, New Jersey.

Lehner, Lois. 1980. “Complete Book of American Kitchen and Dinner Wares.” Wallace-Homestead Book Company, Des Moines, Iowa.

Robinson, Dorothy and Bill Feeny. 1980. “The Official Price Guide to American Pottery & Porcelain.” House of Collectibles, Orlando, Florida.

Quigley, M.A. and D.E. Collier. 1984. “A Capital Place: The Story of Trenton.” Historical Society and Windsor Publications, Inc., Woodland Hills, California.

Bello, Charles A. and Richard C. Grubb. 1988. “Archaeological Investigation of a Portion of the Trenton and Mercer County Traction Corporation Trolley Alignment.” On file, New Jersey Historic Preservation Office (NJDEP), Trenton, New Jersey.

Branin, M. Lelyn. 1988. “The Early Makers of Handcrafted Earthenware and Stoneware in Central and Southern New Jersey.” Associated University Presses, Inc., Cranbury, New Jersey.

Lehner, Lois. 1988. “Lehner’s Encyclopedia of U.S. Marks on Pottery, Porcelain & Clay.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Jasper, Joanne. 1996. “Turn of the Century American Dinnerware 1880s to 1920s.” Collector Books, Paducah, Kentucky.

Goldberg, David J. 1998. “Preliminary Notes on the Pioneer Potters and Potteries of Trenton, N.J.: The First Thirty Years – 1852 – 1882 (And Beyond).” Privately published, Trenton, New Jersey.

Other Names

Anchor Pottery

Block and Lot:
213A/1,2; 217D; 217E

Historic Street Address:
New York Ave corner Mulberry St; E. Trenton above Canal; Delaware & Raritan Canal; Delaware & Raritan Canal above Rose; South Rose; New York Ave near Olden; 930 New York Ave

Municipality:
Millham Township; City of Trenton